MINNESOTA SOCIETY OF HEALTH AND PHYSICAL EDUCATORS

A Better Sex with Diabetes

Diabetes is a serious illness that affects all parts our life, including the most intimate one. Many people, suffering from diabetes, experience certain difficulties in sexual relationships, which affect their general well-being and mood.

Diabetes can cause many complications, including sexual disorders. Therefore, many people suffering from this disease are wondering: is it possible to have sex with diabetes? The answer is – of course you can. Besides, hundreds of russian women on a dating site may suffer from diabetes. This is a challenge to get to know if she is, as you meet each other online.

Fortunately, with such a serious illness as diabetes, sex life can be bright and full if you provide the patient with the necessary treatment and follow a few simple rules. It is important to understand that sex and diabetes can coexist perfectly.

Sex and women with diabetes

Sexual problems in women are mostly associated with low blood circulation in genitals. The lack of oxygen and nutrients makes it difficult for mucus membranes to cope with their functions, which leads to following problems:

  • Mucus membranes of vulva and vagina become very dry; small cracks appear;
  • The skin around the genitals dries out and begins to peel off;
  • The pH of the vaginal mucus changes, which in the healthy state should be acidic. The misbalance, caused by diabetes, makes pH alkaline.

The lack of natural lubrication can result in unpleasant sensations and even pain during a sexual contact. In order to cope with this problem, you should use special moisturizing ointments or suppositories before each sexual intercourse.

Another cause of sexual disorders in women is the death of nerve endings and, as a consequence, a violation of sensitivity in genitals, including the clitoris sensitivity. As a result, a woman may fail to experience pleasure during sex, which leads to the development of frigidity.

Such complication is especially popular among people suffering from type 2 diabetes. In order to avoid the complications you should carefully monitor the sugar level and prevent it from rising.

Both type 1 and type 2 diabetes cause serious disruption in the immune system. Thus, women experience frequent infectious diseases of the genitourinary system, such as:

  • Candidiasis;
  • Cystitis;
  • Herpes.

One of the main reasons here is the high sugar content in the urine, which causes severe irritation of the mucus membranes and creates favorable conditions for infections development. And the low sensitivity makes it difficult for a woman to identify the problem at an early stage, when the treatment is the most effective.

Frequent bacterial and fungal infections significantly complicate the intimate life of a woman. Severe pain, burning and oozing make it impossible to enjoy sex with her partner. In addition, these diseases can be contagious and dangerous for men.

It is important to note that these disorders are typical for women suffering from type 1 and type 2 diabetes.

Patients with diabetes insipidus do not experience physical difficulties in sexual life.

Things you should know when having sex with a diabetic

When planning a sexual intimacy, a man and a woman with diabetes should check their blood glucose level. After all, sex is a serious physical effort that requires a lot of energy.

The insufficient sugar concentration may cause hypoglycemia right during the sexual intercourse. Thus, men and women often prefer to hide their condition, being afraid of partner’s response. However, diabetics should take care of their health and avoid such situations, since hypoglycemia is a very serious condition.

Therefore, when having sex with a diabetic, you should show sensitivity and not let the partner get sick. If two people trust each other, it will help them enjoy the intimacy, despite the serious illness. So, diabetes and sex will cease to be incompatible concepts.

 

 

   

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